Individual Farm: Littleburn Bridge and Farm

[Under Construction].

 

 

In a will date 1620, there is a bequest by Henry Gristhwaite, of Thoralby, of 40 shillings (£2) towards building Littleburn Bridge. In 2017 40 shillings was worth £263.04, see the image below form the Currency converter: 1270–2017, The National Archives indicates the what you could buy with that amount of money, perhaps the most notable one is the last one 40 days wages for a skilled tradesman.

 

 

Currency converter: 1270–2017, courtesy of The National Archives

The will of Henry Gristhwaite of Thoralby detailing his bequest of 40 shillings (£2), value today about £270 can be viewed by clicking on the buttons below for a transcription or digital copy of the entire will. Below is a copy of the section pertaining to the bequest of 40 shillings towards the building of Littleburn bridge.

Transcription copy of the will

Henry Grisethwaite Thoralby 

 Yorkshire, England, Probate Records, 1521-1858

courtesy Ian Spensley

Digital copy of the will

Henry Grisethwaite  Thoralby

Yorkshire, England, Probate Records, 1521-1858

courtesy of West Yorkshire

Archive Service

In addition to the bequest towards the building of Littleburn bridge Henry Grisethwaite bequeathed to his servant Margaret Slater 20s. The following bequests, locally to the poor of the following townships: Bellerby - 10s., Constable Burton - 5s., Thoralby - 25s., Burton in Bishopdale - 5s., Newbiggin - 5s. and Aysgarth - 5s, he was not only a very wealthy man but also a philanthropic individual.

 

In the Survey of the Lordship of Middleham and Richmond, 1605 Thoralby Tenants, Henry Gracethwayt is listed as having the following: 1 house, 1 outhouse, 10 acres of meadow, 1 rood of arable, 3 pasture gates, 19s. 9d. paid in fines in the last year, 9s. 10½d. yearly rent to the King and £2 15s. 10d. as value of things held.

It is likely that the bridge was built soon after 1620. The bridge is Grade II listed with Historic England, but no date is given.

 

In Jane Hatchers book Richmondshire Architecture (1990). Littleburn Hall [House], she dates "the rear elevation chamfered windows as c.1700. The round-arched landing window (see images below) is one of the improvements made a century later when it was the the home of the fourth Baron Rokeby"[early 1800s see below].

 

 

 

 

 

Courtesy of Jane Hatcher 

Richmondshire Architecture (1990)

 

Littleburn bridge is not shown on ‘Jeffreys Map of Yorkshire’ of 1771, which is inconclusive. Yet in the County Record Office at Northallerton the bridge is mentioned in the Quarter Session Records when one of the inhabitants of the village asks for respite for repairs to the bridge which have been prevented by bad weather 2 May 1791. 

 

In the Quarter Session Records in a Letter dated 2 May 1791 relating to Littleburn Bridge in Thoralby from John Breare at Middleham to William Wailes esquire at Northallerton. He is unable to attend the Sessions and asks for a respite in the case against the inhabitants of Thoralby for not repairing Littleburn Bridge. Repairs have been prevented by bad weather, and when the weather settles, the bridge will be completed.

(Information courtesy of Ian Spensley NYCRO:  QSB 1791 2/4/4)

Evidence of Littleburn from Aysgarth Parish Registers

The earliest record in Aysgarth Parish Registers is in 1725/6 when Littleburn is mentioned January 1725/6 when the death and burial of William Sadler of Littleburn is recorded. 

In December 1748 the baptism of a son Tristram of Mr. Hogg Littleburn is recorded. The last baptism of a member of the Hogg family was in 1756. 

Monumental Inscription: Here lies the body of Tristram Hogg (1701-1755) of Littleburn near Thoralby who departed this life July 4th in the 54th year if his age and in the year of our Lord 1755.

The next family to live at Littleburn were Robert Tennant (1729-1807) and his family. Robert had been successful at breeding blue roan race horses and he used some of his wealth to purchase Littleburn House. In May 1781, Robert's daughter Ann Tennant (1757-1843) of Littleburn appears in the Aysgarth Parish Registers when she married Rev. James Law (1755-1831) Aysgarth curate, on 3 May 1781. The couple obviously resided at her parents home as a daughter is baptised three years later. Rev. Law as well as being Aysgarth curate was the school master at Cross Lanes School from 1779-1784.

 

In July 1788, Robert's son Christopher Tennant (1761-1835), of Littleburn married Mary Purchas (1769-1847) of West Burton. Christopher was also the school master at Cross Lanes School. However his conduct was deemed unsatisfactory and the Trustees tried unsuccessfully to have him removed. Christopher appears to have squandered his fathers money and left his wife and children with little means of supporting themselves, becoming labours rather than gentlemen! 

(Information courtesy of Valerie Slater and her book:

A Coverdale Clergymen, The Life, Family and Times of the Reverend James Law 1755-1831 (2021)

Following the death of Robert Tennant of Littleburn in 1807. The house was sold by auction, described as "A neat, commodious dwelling ... with about 20 acres of land of the first quality," Robert also had a "Half share of the Corn Mill at Thoralby in full work and good repair", see auction advertisement below:

Sale of Littleburn in 1807.

Below is a postcard of Littleburn House, date unknown.

Postcard of Littleburn, showing the circular driveway, from the days of horse and carriages.

One of the most celebrated people to live at Littleburn was Morris Robinson, Lord Rokeby (1757-1829). Patriotic zeal at the time of the Napoleonic War also inspired Matthew, fourth Lord Rokeby, who lived at Littleburn, to dedicate the bridge near his house to the Duke of Wellington in 1814. The original stone with its Latin inscription is now preserved in the Village Hall at Thoralby, see image below. 

 

Lord Rokeby is recorded as living at Littleburn in Baines Gazetter, 1823, and Clarkes Gazateer 1828 , see below. I cannot be certain when he came to live at Littleburn but the evidence available indicates it was before 1814, when he penned the inscription to be carved on Littleburn Bridge.

Portrait of Lord Rokeby, courtesty of Royal Trust Collection.

"HISTORY, DIRECTORY & GAZETTEER of the COUNTY OF YORK

Edward Baines, 1823

(Courtesy of the Dales Countryside Museum, Hawes).

THORALBY, in the parish of Aysgarth, wap. of Hang West, and liberty of Richmondshire; 4½ miles SE. of Askrigg. Pop. 342. Lord Morris Rokeby, Littleburn hall, near Thoralby."

"Clarke's Gazetter, 1828 Clarke's Gazetter, 1828

(courtesy of the Dales Countryside Museum, Hawes).

The following is a transcription from the above Book:

Transcribed from Stephen Reynolds Clarke Yorkshire Gazetteer, 1828.

p. 257    THORALBY, N. R. (1) a township in the parish of Aysgarth, wapentake of Hang West, 4½ miles S. E. from Askrigg; inhabitants, 342. In this township are Littleburn House, the seat of Lord Rokeby."

 

"Aberdeen Journal – 6th May 1829 Deaths

On the 19th ult. at Thoralby, near Leyburn, aged seventy-one, the Right Hon. Morris, Lord Rokeby, of Armagh, and a Baronet. His Lordship is succeeded in his titles and estates by his brother, Matthew Montagu, Esq. of Portman Square, London. ..."

"Lancaster Gazette - 13th June, 1829 Deaths

... On the 9th ult. at Thoralby, near Leyburn, Yorkshire, Lawson Dunn, Esq. friend and companion of the late Right Hon. Morris, of Rokeby, whom he survived but three weeks. ..."

 

Burial: 1829, Apr 24 Morris Robinson, aged 71, Littleburn, Thoralby (Lord Rokeby), buried St. Andrews Church Aysgarth.

Monumental Inscriptions Section F: St. Andrew's Church, Aysgarth

Inside Church North West Corner Window.

"To the memory of the Right Hon. Morris Lord ROKEBY late of Littleburn. Erected by Elizabeth DUNN."

The will of Morris Robinson (digital copy and transcription below) is fascinating to read he left many endowments to his friends and staff a few of which are highlighted here, for the full details click on a button below:

"... I give and devise one garth lying in Thoralby ... also some messuages or tenements formerly a Poor House [Primitive Methodist Chapel] with the stables and all the other appurtenances belonging to it in Thoralby which I purchased from the town of Thoralby to my housekeeper MARY PEACOCK her heirs and assigns forever which I devise to her in recognition of her infirmities, inability to work and her faithful service and I give and bequeath to the said Mary Peacock an annuity or yearly sum of one hundred pounds to be paid half yearly for her natural life. The first payment to be made at the end of six calendar months after my decease. I also give and bequeath to the said Mary Peacock two hundred pounds payable immediately after my decease or as soon as possible. I also give to her seven hundred pounds payable twelve months after my decease and a further two hundred pounds to be paid eighteen months after my decease. I also give to the said Mary Peacock all plate, china, linen, household goods and furniture (save Deeds and papers and the boxes containing them) which are in the house which she rents in Thoralby

I give and bequeath the messuage or tenement together with all the closes, lands and heriditaments situate in Thoralby ... called the Hill House [Thoral Cottage] to LAWSON DUNN the elder of Thoralby, Artist, and his assigns throughout his life without impeachment of waste and after his death to his wife ANN if she shall be living. After the death of the said Ann to ELIZABETH DUNN, daughter of the said Lawson Dunn the elder, if she be living, if she should die before the survivor of her parents then I give the said property to LAWSON DUNN the younger, son of the said Lawson Dunn the elder. I also give to the said Lawson Dunn the elder two hundred pounds payable immediately after my death as long as the said Lawson Dunn does not interfere or meddle with the said Mary Peacock in her use and enjoyment of the articles bequeathed to her. I also give to the said Lawson Dunn the elder three hundred pounds payable to him within 12 months of my decease and an annuity of one hundred pounds payable half yearly. After the death of the said Lawson Dunn the elder I give to his wife Ann the annuity of fifty pounds. I give to each of Elizabeth Dunn and Lawson Dunn the younger the annuity of twenty five pounds as long as their mother shall live and after her death I give to each of them an annuity of fifty pounds

I give to the said Elizabeth Dunn two hundred pounds payable immediately after my decease and the further sum of seven hundred pounds payable twelve months after my decease

I give to Lawson Dunn the younger two hundred pounds payable immediately after my decease and the further sum of seven hundred pounds payable twelve months after my decease

I give to my executor three hundred pounds upon trust, that is to say to invest it in govt funds and to pay the interest and any dividends to the said Ann Dunn for her life for her own use independent of any present or future husband. After the death of the said Ann Dunn to pay the principal of three hundred pounds between Elizabeth Dunn and Lawson Dunn the younger

I give to the said Elizabeth Dunn two hundred pounds payable immediately after my decease and the further sum of seven hundred pounds payable twelve months after my decease

I give to Lawson Dunn the younger two hundred pounds payable immediately after my decease and the further sum of seven hundred pounds payable twelve months after my decease

I give to my executor three hundred pounds upon trust, that is to say to invest it in govt funds and to pay the interest and any dividends to the said Ann Dunn for her life for her own use independent of any present or future husband. After the death of the said Ann Dunn to pay the principal of three hundred pounds between Elizabeth Dunn and Lawson Dunn the younger

... I give to MARTHA CLAYTON, widow of THOMAS CLAYTON, my late coachman, the sum of fifty pounds and an annuity of fifteen pounds payable half yearly. I also give to the 2 daughters of the said Martha Clayton twenty pounds apiece

I give to ROBERT WOODING my late gardener the sum of three hundred and fifteen pounds and in case he should die before me then the said sum is to go to his next of kin

I give to JAMES GRAHAM, nephew of MATTHEW GRAHAM, an old and faithful servant in my family exclusive of any debt which I may owe him

... Codicil: The legacies of two hundred and seven hundred pounds payable to Elizabeth Dunn and Lawrence Dunn the younger shall not be payable until they have reached the age of twenty one

... To ANN MOOR, my servant, ten pounds, and my executor to supply suitable mourning. I also give to her ninety pounds payable with interest at the rate of five pounds per annum after she reaches the age of 25

To JAMES MOOR, brother of the said Ann, ten pounds payable immediately and suitable mourning, plus fifty pounds payable when he reaches 21

... I give to Mary Peacock, spinster of Littleburn £400 above the previous bequests in my will to be paid as soon as there are funds in my personal estate

To Lawson Dunn the younger I give £700 payable in the same manner to Elizabeth Dunn, his sister £600 payable in the same manner, to Ann Dunn, wife of Lawson Dunn the elder £300, payable in the same manner, to Lawson Dunn the elder £100 payable in 4 instalments

To NATHANIEL SCOTT my servant £40 over and above any wages due

... To JANE PALEY £5 immediately and a further £30 payable once there are funds available in my personal estate

To ANN DAVY, my servant, £5 over and above any wages due and a further 20 guineas payable once there are funds available in my personal estate

To ALICE LUPTON £5 over and above anything I owe her and £15 payable once there are funds available in my personal estate

To THOMAS GILL £5 over and above his wages due and 60 guineas payable once there are funds available in my personal estate.

To MARY PALEY daughter of MARY PALEY of Burton I give £5 immediately and a further 25 guineas payable once there are funds available in my personal estate

... To BETTY SARGINSON of Thoralby £10 paid in like manner, to Miss JANE SADLER of Thoralby 100 guineas payable in arrears of a debt I owe her payable once there are funds available in my personal estate

... To JOHN BUTTERFIELD of Thoralby £5 in like manner and £25 payable once there are funds in my personal estate. I also give him an annuity of £6/

... To MRs WOOD of Askrigg, the widow of the Rev JEFFERY WOOD of West Burton I give £10 payable once there are funds in my personal estate

To the Rev RICHARD WOOD her son £10 payable once there are funds in my personal estate

To Mrs WALTER of Burton the daughter of the late Mr PURCHAS £5 payable once there are funds in my personal estate

To Mrs SADLER of Thoralby the widow of the late ROBERT SADLER £5 payable once there are funds in my personal estate

To JOHN SADLER her son 1 guinea payable once there are funds in my personal estate

... To Ann Dunn, wife of Lawson Dunn the elder, 50 guineas

To Mary Paley, wife of JOHN PALEY a further £20

... To PHILIP GOLDSMITH of Leyburne, Doctor in Medecine, 100 guineas and 50 guineas to his present wife.

... Signed 10 April 1829

Witnessed: WILLIAM HAMMOND farmer, JOHN RAW farmer, both of Thoralby, JOHN BUCKTON Attorney at Canterbury

Proved 18th June 1829 at London by his brother Matthew Baron Rokeby, heretofore Matthew Montagu Esq."

Transcription of the will

The Right Honorable Morris Baron Rokeby

courtesy of the

Upper Dales Family History Group

Digital copy of the will

The Right Honorable Morris Baron Rokeby

England & Wales, Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills, 1384-1858 

courtesy of West Yorkshire Archive Service

In the 1830s, Thomas and Elizabeth Metcalfe farmed at Littleburn, with several of their children being born there. By the time of the tithe the 1840 tithe award and map, show that the house was owned by Rev. Richard Wood (see tithe map below) and in the occupation of Thomas Hogg, [another Hogg]. At this time over 50 acres of land was attributed to Littleburn, whereas in the 1807 sale some twenty acres had been included in the sale. The Hogg family can be viewed on the 1841 Census for Thoralby, residing at Littleburn. 

The tithe map for Thoralby in1840 showing Littleburn, the nearby gill of Swinacote running into Bishopdale Beck and the bridge, [now over 200 years old], map, courtesy of The National Archives Ref: IR 30/42/370.

The Tithe Award shows The Reverend Richard Wood owned the dwelling house of Littleburn and a couple of pasture land [Littleburn Stones] and plantation, wood, pasture and meadow land totalling a further 49 acres, all of which were in the occupation of Thomas Hogg.

 In March, 1846 Littleburn was advertised for sale in the Wensleydale Advertiser, courtesy of the DCM, Hawes, see below:

The auction details state that Mr Hogg is leaving the neighbourhood and describes "a large assortment of Modern and Elegant household furniture to be sold ... for Ready Money." Included in the sale were a gig and harness, saddles, bridles, a cart and plough and other farming implements. 

From T. Bulmer & Co., History & Topography , and Directory of North Yorkshire 1890

(courtesy of the Dales Countryside Museum, Hawes)

 

"Littleburn House, an ancient mansion near the village, but now a farmhouse, was for some time the residence of the Lords Rokeby; and on a bridge, leading to the house, is an elegant Latin inscription from the pen of the fourth Lord Rokeby, who, whilst resident here, published a drama, entitled "John Churchill, Duke of Marlborough," which was printed at Leyburn. Edgeley was formerly the property and seat of Matthew Robinson, Esq., father of Mrs. Elizabeth Montague, a lady of extraordinary talents and conversational powers. In 1769 she published "An Essay on the Writings and Genius of Shakespeare," in answer to the objections of Voltaire, which obtained a great and deserved reputation, and still ranks with the best illustrations of the transcendent powers of the "immortal bard." She formed a literary society, which held its meetings in her house in London, and was nick-named the "Blue Stocking Club," from the circumstance that one of the gentlemen members always exhibited a preference for that colour in his hosiery."

From Eden Vale to the Plain of York, Edmund Bogg, 1894

(courtesy of the Dales Countryside Museum, Hawes)

The following is a transcription from the above Book:

p. 233-235 Transcribed From Eden Vale to the Plain of York, Edmund Bogg, 1894

p.234

"In 1360 a chantry chapel was built here by Maria de Neville, Lady of Middleham, and although suppressed at the dissolution of the monasteries, the site is still known as Chapel Close [Chapel Garth].

 

Littleburn House, now a farmstead, was for some time the residence of Matthew, fourth Lord Rokeby. On the bridge near the mansion is to be seen a Latin inscription from this lord's pen.

TRANSLATION. 

IN GOD THE ONLY SECURITY.

This Egerian bridge, at the expense of the neighbourhood thrown over this river, awkwardly narrow and at times most dangerous, in memory of peace and security, is under God, dedicated to Wellington.

O chieftain, courageous arbiter of war, who bringest peace, as patron of this bridge, receive the floods of this bounding water. May the Great Ocean take these floods of the fountain and may this arch to thy triumph shine!" 

At Edgley, for some time dwelt the well-known Mrs. Montague, at whose house in London the famous "Blue Stocking Club" was held. This name was received by the reason of one of the members always wearing stockings of the above colour. The inhabitants of Thoralby received much benefit by those distinguished visitors dwelling in their neighbourhood. Near to the village is Heaning Gill, locally know as the silver chain, a succession of waterfalls and cascades bursting from the wooded heights, and silvering through scenes of remarkable beauty to the vale below. During the Martinmas week Thoralby is roused from her slumbers; then all the young men and maidens are at home for a week’s holiday, and there is the usual dressing up of guys and mumming, etc., and the perambulating of the village to the din of concertina and fiddle, and the begging from house to house for anything to swell the big feast, which takes place either at the inn or some large room, ending with a jumping dance, which concludes the festivities [Thoralby Feast]."

OWNERSHIP and OCCUPTION of LITTEBURN FARM

 

From the 1850s to the early 1900s the Fawcett family resided at Littleburn, being both farmers and carpenters, according to the census returns, but in 1911 the house was recorded as being uninhabited, yet in Kellys Trade Directory of 1913, Misses Elizabeth & Jane Fawcett are letting apartments at Littleburn. In 1918 the Atkinson family were residing at Littleburn as a William Atkinson (poss. John William Atkinson (1897-1955) is listed on the Absent Voters' List of December 1918, Thoralby, Littleburn. His elder brothers: George James Atkinson and Richard Matthew Atkinson, all served in WW1.

 

By the time of the 1921 census the John Blades (1881-1952) and his family were living at Littleburn and the occupation of John Blades is described as dairy farmer. In 1924 a Margaret Lambert (1864-1924), mother-in-law of John Blades, is recoded in Aysgarth Parish Church as dying at Littleburn aged 60. The wife, of John Blades, Mary Annie Blades (1892-1930) aged 38 Littleburn, is recorded in Aysgarth Parish Church as dying at Littleburn in 1930. Her husband John moved to the Skipton area and re-married in 1936, but on his death in 1952, he was buried at Aysgarth Parish Church, aged 71, residing in Horton-in-Ribblesdale.

 

By 1933 Kellys Trade Directory records John [Wm.] Atkinson (1899-1955), as farming at Littleburn, later farming by 1939, farming at High Green Farm, Thoralby.  By the time of the 1939 Identity Register, James Pickard Junior (1904-1973) and his wife Doris Isabell Pickard, née Constantine (1914-1987), are residing and are dairy farmers at Littleburn. The 1940s Farm Survey shows that James Pickard and his family were living at Littleburn, and farming 40 acres, the holding being owned by the previously mentioned John Blades.

 

Jeffrey Heseltine (1891-1972), dairy farmer also farmed 54½ acres of rough grazing at Littleburn farm, whilst farming and living at Cote Bottom Farm, according to the National Farm Survey 1941-43.  By the early 1950s, Joseph Heseltine (1881-1959), son of Jeffrey Heseltine of Cote Bottom Farm, was farming at Littleburn and died there in December 1959.

Deaths and burials recorded in Aysgarth Parish Registers and or Monumental Inscriptions: 

  1. William Sadler, Littleburn, Thoralby 12 Jan 1725

  2. Jo[hn] Sadler, Littleburn, Thoralby with affidavit 22 Nov 1732

  3. Anne Sadler, Littleburn, Thoralby 16 May 1744 

  4. Mr Tristram Hogg, Littleburn, Thoralby July 6 1755 

  5. John Hogg son of Tristram & Jane Littleburn, Thoralby 27 May 1770

  6. Jane Tennant (1720-1803), wife of Robert Littleburn, Thoralby 10 Aug 1803

  7. Robert Tennant (1729-1807), Robert Tennant May 5 1807, Thoralby, [Littleburn]  

  8. Morris Robinson (1758-1829) aged 71 Littleburn, Thoralby (Lord Rokeby) 24 Apr 1829

  9. John Fawcett (1854-1859) aged 6 Littleburn, Thoralby 26 April 1859

  10. John Fawcett (1789-1865) aged 76 Littleburn, Thoralby 15 Sep 1865 [grandfather of above]

  11. Jane Fawcett (1790-1873) aged 82 Littleburn, Thoralby 11 Mar 1873 [wife of above]

  12. Thomas Fawcett aged 67 Littleburn, Thoralby 10 Dec 1889 [son of John and Jane Fawcett above]

  13. James Fawcett 70 (1825-1895) aged 70 Littleburn, Thoralby 8 Jan 1895 [son of John and Jane Fawcett]

  14. Margaret Lambert (1864-1924) aged 60 of Littleburn, Thoralby 31 July 1924 [mother of Mary Annie below]

  15. Mary Annie Blades (1892-1930) aged 38 Littleburn, Thoralby  9 June 1930

  16. Joseph Heseltine (1881-1959) aged 78 Littleburn, Thoralby 10 Dec 1959

Below is a photograph of Littleburn house when John William Atkinson (1865-1944) and his family lived and farmed there c.1918 and during the 1930s, finally settling at High Green Farm, Thoralby.

Three members of the Atkinson family at Littleburn House,

early 1900s, courtesy of Heather Percival née Atkinson.

KELLY'S  DIRECTORY, OF THE NORTH & EAST RIDINGS OF YORKSHIRE 1937 EDITED BY E.R. Kelly.

(Courtesy of the Local Studies Collection, Northallerton Library).

p.31

 

"THORALBY … At Littleburn there is an interesting bridge given by the then Lord Rokeby [1758-1829] in 1814, with a Latin inscription in honour of the Duke of Wellington."

[NOTE: The bridge was constructed sometime after 1620 following a bequest and the support of the neigbourhood which is reflected in the text on the inscription: "at the expense of the neighbourhood", see Latin translation below. It is the Latin inscription on the bridge which was given by Lord Rokeby, resident at Littleburn 1814-1829, not the bridge itself].

1814 Littleburn Bridge

 

(Latin Inscription)

Sola in Deo Salus Pons egerianus incolarum viciniorum sumptu, fftumini

prave parumper perioulosissimo super adductus paci saluti Wellington!o gaoer

Iccipe dux, belli , quern pax petit, arbiter audax.pontigerus fluctus, exilientis aquae, Fontigenas fluctug capiat mare divitig

 

undae Inque triumphall splendeat arcus ovans.

In God the only security This Egerian Bridge, at the expense of the neighbourhood thrown over this river, awkwardly narrow

 

and at times most dangerous in memory of peace and security, is, under God dedicated to Wellington.

O Chieftain, courageous arbiter of war, who bringest peace, as patron of this bridge, receive floods of this bounding water.

 

May the great ocean take these floods of the fountain, and may this arch to thy triumph shine.

Above information courtesy of Adrian Sadler and also the photograph of the bridge Below:

Below is a photograph of Dalesbread Sheep being judged at Littleburn in the 1950s, courtesy of Ann Holubecki.

Home of Joseph Heseltine (1881-1959), the field is alongside the bridge no. 320 on the tithe map and named Cow Close.

As children we used to have Thoralby bonfire in the lane near Littleburn bridge in the lay-by on the left-hand side

 

just before the bridge, farmers would deposit their hedge trimmings etc. and we would collect wood.