World War One

Memorabilia

Aysgarth Parish 

Below are items of memorabilia for World War One.

The names are in alphabetical order, by Place name or Surname, scroll down to find a particular name. 

Please notify me of any errors. Thank you.

If you have more information or a photograph to add, please contact me, thank you.

The framed Roll of Honour, for Aysgarth township, was recently discovered in Aysgarth Institute, see the Home Front section  Aysgarth for a transcript of the 50 names.

Framed Roll of Honour 

in the Great War

(courtesy of Aysgarth Institute).

Below is a close up of the 'Names of Men Members of this Institute who went from Aysgarth Township and  Thornton Rust Townships to serve in the Great War 1914-1918'. 'Men who gave their lives for their Country', and 'Nurses' are listed separately below the list of names. All the names are listed in alphabetical order. See the Home Front section  Aysgarth for a transcript of the 50 names .

Names on the Roll of Honour 

in the Great War

(courtesy of Aysgarth Institute).

Aysgarth Methodist Chapel Roll of Honour - 36 Names, for the transcript of the names, see the Home Front section  Aysgarth.

Aysgarth Methodist Chapel

Roll of Honour in the Great War

(courtesy of Aysgarth Methodist Chapel).

Harold's widow, Hannah, had his medals, death penny, letter from the King and their wedding  photograph framed, see photographs below. For Harold's biography see Bibliographies section A-C.

Harold Binks' British War Medal

(courtesy of Joyce Binks and Madge Sayer).

Harold Binks' Victory Medal

(courtesy of Joyce Binks and Madge Sayer).

Private Harold Binks of West Burton, framed

war memorabilia

(courtesy of Joyce Binks and Madge Sayer)

Harold Binks’ Death Penny 

(courtesy of Joyce Binks and Madge Sayer).

Letter from King George V

to Harold Binks’ widow

(courtesy of Joyce Binks

and Madge Sayer)

Harold Binks & Hannah Paley

on their wedding day, May 1916

(courtesy of Joyce Binks and Madge Sayer)

When the Treaty of Versailles was signed on 28th June 1919, Saturday 19th July was declared a bank holiday, known as Peace Day. These are the amazing celebratory scenes at the Rookery, Bishopdale, former home of Colonel John William Lodge, who died in 1917.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peace Day Celebrations at the Rookery, Bishopdale, 19th July 1919

(courtesy of DCM, Hawes).

A commemorative cup and saucer from the Peace Celebrations in Bishopdale on Saturday 19th July 1919.

Burton-cum-Walden

Below is the framed Memorial to the fallen, displayed in West Burton Methodist Chapel and the small plaque at the base of the frame.

West Burton Methodist Chapel

Framed Memorial of the Fallen 1914-1918

(courtesy of West Burton Methodist Chapel).

Plaque on the above Memorial

(courtesy of West Burton Methodist Chapel).

Mark Hammond (1894-1981)                                                    Aysgarth

Mark Hammond served as a Gunner in the Royal Garrison Artillery, Unit 111HB (Heavy Brigade). Below are some WW1 memorabilia that belonged to Mark. The spurs are a reminder that horses played a significant part in the Great War. Further information about Mark can be seen in the Biographies section H-L

Mark’s WW1 Memorabilia: Horse spurs, shoulder badge, cap badge, War Medal, Victory Medal and penknife.

(Courtesy of Clive Hammond, grandson.)

Below is a letter to his niece, Maggie Simpson written on 17 December 1917[Maggie, who was aged 20 when she received the letter, was the eldest daughter of Jack's sister, Jane Elizabeth]. The transcript and further information about Jack can be seen in the Biographies section H-L. The letter was enclosed in a Christmas Card, see below, courtesy of Mary Hugill and Edith Pratt.

The Card and letter were posted whilst on Active Service and bear the postmark: 20 Dec 17.

Christmas Card sent by Jack Heseltine, 1917

(courtesy of Mary Hugill and Edith Pratt).

Below is the transcript of a letter to his niece, Maggie Simpson, on Sunday 28 May 1916[Maggie, who was aged 19 when she received the letter, was the eldest daughter of Jack's sister, Jane Elizabeth]. The transcript and further information about Matthew can be seen in the Biographies section H-L. Letter courtesy of Mary Hugill and Edith Pratt.

Letter sent by Matthew Heseltine, 1916

(courtesy of Mary Hugill and Edith Pratt).

In the letter above Matthew mentions hopefully getting leave next month, but that would be too late to spend his birthday at home with family. Sadly Matthew did not get the hoped for leave, and was killed in action in less than four months after writing this letter, aged only 21. His elder brother John (see above) writes to the same niece that he is serving 'close to the place where your Uncle Matt was killed.' This must have been unimaginably difficult for John and the many others who lost someone close.

For more detailed information about Vic. see Biographies section Q-Z.

Medals from left to right: The 1914–15 Star, British War Medal, Victory Medal and Silver War Badge.

(courtesy of G.V. & A. Sadler.)

The Silver War Badge was issued in the United Kingdom and the British Empire to service personnel who had been honourably discharged due to wounds or sickness from military service in World War I. The certificate below dated 28.11.1918, certifies that Vic. is no longer physically fit for war service, and confirms his place of enlistment as Northallerton. The certificate underneath is the roll of individuals entitled to the 'war badge'. Vic. is second on the list and it shows he enlisted on 14.9.1914, discharged on 28.11.1918, aged 22.

 Silver War Badge.

(courtesy of G.V. & A. Sadler.)

 Medical Discharge Certificate

(courtesy of G.V. & A. Sadler.)

Roll of Individuals entitled to the War Badge

(courtesy of The National Archives).

 Leg Wrappings, puttees.

(courtesy of G.V. & A. Sadler.)

Horse spurs.

(courtesy of G.V. & A. Sadler.)

Dorothy Wright née Wray (1824-1919)     Thoralby

Dorothy Wray was born at Thoralby in 1823, her parents were William Wray of Aysgarth and Jane Stirk of Newbiggin. Her father was a labourer, and by the 1820s the family were living in Thoralby. Dorothy had left her home village by the time of the 1841 census, when at the age of eighteen she was living at Keighly, 36 miles away and working as a female servant. At the age of 21 in 1844, she married Joseph Hanson, a wool sorter of Keighley. Sadly Joseph died aged only 23. Dorothy married again in January 1850 at Keighly, to William Wright, a widower and shuttle maker, he was aged 29 and she was 25 and a dressmaker. Together they had five children, moving to Bradford by 1851. Dorothy is pictured below at her home of 15 St. Andrews Place, Bradford, when aged ninety-three.

The caption from the newspaper is: "MRS DORTHY WRIGHT Mrs Dorothy Wright, of 15, St. Andrew's Place Bradford, widow of Mr. William Wright, who was a manufacturer in Longside Lane, has contributed a record war-work of remarkable utility. She has knitted 240 pairs of socks, 64 pairs of mittens, four pairs of slippers and four scarves as comforts for Bradford soldiers at the front, and has also made fine lace which has realised money in the same excellent cause. Nor is that all. No fewer than eight grandsons of Mrs. Wright are serving with the forces. Mrs. Wright is 93 years of age." Article reproduced courtesy of Matthew Hudson a several x great grandson.

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